E-Learning Using Semantic Web and End-User Programming Techniques

E-Learning Using Semantic Web and End-User Programming Techniques




Introduction

Although there are web modelling tools obtainable it nevertheless needs important effort to adapt these tools for educational use. Research is needed into creation of Semantic Web models for educators to use in order to create learning objects and models. This educational modelling research should focus on the creation of a web based knowledge management system, and migration of simple models that are typically produced in spreadsheets to a shared learning ecosystem.

With the development of technologies under the general terms of Semantic Web and Web 2.0 there are opportunities to establish a highly interactive web based learning ecosystem. The constructionist approach to understanding problems is to learn about them by modelling them. This approach can be used in combination with research into enabling end-user programming techniques in order to provide an ecosystem for non programmers to form their problems. Visualisation and interaction provide rapid feedback that gives a powerful representation of the ecosystem to be modelled.

Many people would like to make greater use of computer technology but are hampered by the need to learn programming languages if they are to fully interact with software. Instead they are limited to the use of certain features that are provided for them. A further restriction is the cost of software, and it is important to develop free software and encourage a community of end-user developers, and modellers.

The aim should be to create a software development ecosystem that enables people to customise their own software solution. This is an different to provision of software as a finished article that can’t be changed. The e-learning software can be customised without requiring programming skill.

Methodology

A Semantic Web modelling infrastructure could be produced to be the basis of future research in learning systems. In order to unprotected to these aims it is important to examine applications that assist in form building and critically review them. The system we could be used to promote engineering to a skeptical public who see the profession as poorly paid and dirty, ‘House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology report science and society’ [1], and far away from the public [2]. The aim of this research is to try to bring together the areas of E-Learning, End-User Programming and the Semantic Web.

Since Engelbart’s Augment [3] there have been attempts to create systems to aid learning. Papert [4] and Smith [5] built on the Augment research to develop a method of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) that can be applied to e-learning. These systems were defined prior to the Semantic Web. It is important now to re-examine and apply this research using Semantic Web/Web 2.0 tools and techniques. Some examples are obtainable [6], more information about the history of end-user programming is obtainable [7].

Mechanisms of Web 2.0 [8] applications include Google web spreadsheets [9]. These applications are increasing in popularity, and can provide modelling capability over the Web, the use of Web 2.0 for public policy is examined in [10]. The advantages of open source collaboration are that in addition as allowing researchers to co-function and work together where they proportion an interest; it also allows the untapped possible to be developed of those who do not have an official research position. This includes students, people employed outside the academic ecosystem, retired people and amateurs who have useful skill. Astronomy, for example, has harnessed skills of this very different range of people to make new discoveries. The skill provided by anyone involved can be applied to feedback on usefulness, or ease of use of software, in addition as actual involvement in software development. This method feedback would be sought from users of software already if they were not software experts. Researchers would assistance the community by providing education tools online and for libraries. This is different from other open source communities in that the intention is to make the software easier to use and develop, and so include those who have not before been capable of participating in software development.

An E-Learning and Modelling tool could bring together experts in science, engineering, systems modelling, computing, web development, and Human Computer Interaction. In any location there are likely to be several researchers examining a different part of a related overall subject, such as web based systems. This method there is a need to co-ordinate researchers, in computing and engineering in a project to link together work on information management and visualisation for modelling and decision sustain.

Many people who are experts in their domain want to create software models. Scaffidi et al [11] show that most people who develop software are end users not specialized programmers. End-user programming is particularly important in this research to make it possible for people who do not have a programming background to create their own educational tools. Semantic Web tools and techniques can be used to create a web based end-user programming ecosystem, these aims are also explained in [12]. People can then use this to create their own software. This software could allow interactive visual modelling of information. This corresponds to the kind of work typically undertaken using spreadsheets for modelling, and web editors for knowledge management.

Semantic/Web 2.0 Web Tools

The need is for an different way of representing these models, which does not require the user to write code. The tool produced must make it functional to interact with and change educational models and to proportion information with others. Such a project can include use of editing tools such as wikis [13][14][15], blogs, and semantic web editors [16][17][18] to allow discussion and explanation of the models.

There is an urgent need for Semantic Web tools to illustrate the benefits this technology can provide for education, ‘EASE: The European Association Semantic Web Education’ [19] explains this need. Some Semantic Web tools are obtainable, explained by EASE and in the Jena User Conference [20] or being developed at present, but they are nevertheless difficult for people to make use of as they require a good deal of development skill. REASE (the repository of EASE for learning units) [21] provides a way to find and create learning materials for industrial applications of Semantic Web technologies.

The meaningful problem is enabling a Semantic Web infrastructure that will be the basis for future research in learning systems. To unprotected to this, a modelling ecosystem needs to be produced in order to allow people to customise their own models. This ecosystem can be produced using an open standard language such as XML (eXtensible Markup Language). As the high level translation this infrastructure would depend on tools developed in order to assist the user, provide an interface and manage the user interface. This is why tools should be used such as Protégé [13], Amaya [16][17][18]. Until recently XML has been used to represent information, and programming languages used for actual code. Semantic languages such as XML can be applied to software development in addition as information representation, as they provide a higher level declarative view of the problem. Semantic Web techniques should be used because they can ease computer based communication. Berners-Lee defined the Semantic Web as ‘a web of data that can be processed directly or indirectly by machines’ [22]. Flexibility is basic when different people are not all using the same systems. To unprotected to this flexibility ontology languages such as the open standard OWL (Web Ontology Language) [23] can be used. OWL can be searched using SPARQL [24] because it is based on RDF (Resource Description Framework)/XML, and can be searched and accessed using XQuery [25] and XForms [26].

End-User Programming

An end-user programming project could include co-operation with the Institute for End User Computing (IEUC) [27]. Other End-User Programming Consortiums are End-Users Shaping Effective Software (EUSES) [28] and Network of Excellence on End User Development (EUD.Net) [29]. An end-user programming ecosystem can make use of ‘Program Transformation’. Program Transformation allows for writing in one representation or language, and translating to another. This is particularly useful for language independent programming, or for high level end-user programming that can then be translated to a language more easily understood by computer systems. This research is influenced by the theory of constructionism explained in [30] and the use of Logo for teaching [31] and [32]. This research could be particularly focused on the web ecosystem, as this is cheap to sustain and allows for distributed modelling, and learning [30].

Human Computer Interaction

Use of the Semantic Web is to be a method for open standard representation of learning material, transformation into different representations as required, and for provision of a high level interface as a tool for form creation, and translation to educational objects. To unprotected to this is necessary to create a translator that converts the diagrammatic representation of a problem into e-learning objects. Translations could be performed into any programming or meta-programming language or open standard information representation language, the visualisation of the form produced could be displayed on the web. A two way translation is needed between human and computer, and between different software environments. This definition used by Simons and Parmee [33] explains the aim “a kind of action that occurs as two or more objects have an effect on each other. The idea of a two-way effect is basic to the concept of interaction, as opposed to a one way causal effect”.

This communication strategy improves opportunities for end-user programming, sharing of information, and education of both users and computer software. The analogy of educating computer software to do what the user intends is called programming by demonstration in ‘Watch What I Do: Programming by Demonstration’ [34]. The user has the role of an educator of the software which acts as an apprentice to learn what is required. Learners are consequently able to instruct the software and so program solutions, using an adaptive modelling tool. The education is then a two way course of action of the user learning from computer based software, and the software learning to do what the user requires. In order to permit understanding of the models and e-learning objects it is basic to visualise them and allow interaction. The visualisation can be presented in various ways. Two examples are: as a tree (that can be colour coded to represent different types of information) and as an interactive SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) diagram of a part to be modelled. SVG is an XML based syntax so can be searched and modelled as such. Examples show a tree based representation of engineering elements [35], and how a tree based representation is converted into an interactive diagrammatic representation [36]. Transformations are performed between a taxonomy representation of information into many different visualisations and software representations. This course of action converts an recondite representation of a problem to a concrete form produced with the aid of two way communication between the user and the modelling tool.

Highly interactive web pages that act like programs to provide a user interface can be used to provide an interactive User pushed Programming ecosystem. These interactive web pages can be based on visual programming languages such as Alice [37]. Interactive web programs can also be produced using scripting languages and XML combinations such as AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript And XML), which is an overall name for techniques to create highly interactive web pages. Ajax techniques for creation of interactive web models will assist computer literate end-users in programming responsibilities on the web [38].

Collaborative Modelling

Huhns [39] and Paternò [40] both explain that alternatives to current software development approach are required. The need is to translate from a form-based visual representation understood by users to software. Johnson [41] explains that successful interaction requires mapping between levels of abstractions and that translation between these abstraction levels required by users and computers is difficult. He explains that this problem often method systems are produced that make the user cope with the problems of mis-translation. The representation of rules and information can be illustrated diagrammatically. It is possible to describe algorithms by concrete examples instead of abstractly. Models must be designed and visualised so that they convey to users a representation of a problem that assists with their vision of it. This subject is explored in [42] and is the basis of our visualisation techniques that permit users to create and understand models, which are translated into software representations.

Conclusion

Advantages of this research are : –

– Creation of an open standard online e-learning ecosystem that is usable by non-programmers.

– Enabling of creation of e-learning objects by non programmers.

– Enabling extensive spread and sharing of models over the web.

– Provision of an educational resource for students, scientists, engineers, software developers, arts, and business.

– Increased user involvement in e-learning development to allow savings in cost and time taken for this development, and permit greater creation and use of educational tools.

– Availability of e-learning models and interactive visualisation of educational objects much more widely using browser based software.

– Enabling many more people to program.

– Opening up opportunities to people currently outside formal education.

This research can bridge the gap between computer literate people and e-learning software creation. This can give a functional illustration of the benefits end-user programming and Semantic Web techniques could provide for e-learning.

References

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